After historic flooding, Yosemite park shows world’s third-tallest waterfall, photos show

After the snow and rain from last weekend’s storm unleashed rivers and mountain streams, sending debris flows roaring across farmlands and connecting communities, however, the storm slowed down to a crawl over Yosemite National…

After historic flooding, Yosemite park shows world's third-tallest waterfall, photos show

After the snow and rain from last weekend’s storm unleashed rivers and mountain streams, sending debris flows roaring across farmlands and connecting communities, however, the storm slowed down to a crawl over Yosemite National Park on Sunday night.

However, as valley visitors enjoyed the normally deserted park, the park’s iconic Yosemite Falls showered trillions of gallons of water in the clearest reservoir level since September 2010.

So swollen was the Vernal Fall, the first section of the world’s third-tallest waterfall, the water began pouring in four miles ahead of its natural exit point. The force of the gravity-fed cascade, for a time, flooded the Yosemite Valley. The photos being shared on social media and the images of such cascades lighting up the night sky have generated an endless variety of headlines about what’s really important in life: The water was.

Despite weather conditions that may be an infinitesimal inconvenience to some park visitors, such mayhem prompted a tour guide Sunday night to put it another way.

“Over a period of hours, you can re-create the style of things you normally see in the Grand Canyon,” Tiffany Thorson said as the popular fall show was heating up. “You’re going to see great periods of descending before Vernal (Fall) is built up again. I was telling people it’ll almost feel like a movie.”

Despite the short time frame for the Yosemite Falls display, the danger was serious enough for about 100 people to be evacuated. Water surged over a mile-long bank in a mudslide on the north side of El Capitan, the largest rock face in Yosemite. Crews spent much of Sunday working to restore the water flow into the Yosemite River, said park spokesman Scott Gediman.

Yosemite Valley was opened after closure because of flooding of homes, cars and roadways in neighboring communities. Dredging boats were still mopping up flooded roads in the park late Sunday.

As for the adjacent town of Mariposa, people ran from the rain and flooding just as they had last weekend, but instead of bailing out homes, many streamed down the streets toward the park, hoping to catch a glimpse of the cascades.

“I’m so happy we’re in here,” Mariposa resident Christine Rios told The Fresno Bee, as she poured herself into her car late Sunday morning. “It’s so good we’re in. You can hardly taste it, but you know what? It’s dry.”

Meanwhile, in California’s wine country, on Sunday, slushy wine grapes continued to go sour in Napa Valley. At least 19 major vineyards in the area have been damaged and many more have suffered some damage, according to a poll conducted by UC Davis. Some of the damage was from floodwater washing over the bottling and sugar production facilities and the rest was from ice that fell from already-melted trees, the poll reported.

Most of the Napa Valley farmers affected by the storm felt the most damage over the weekend and expect to resume normal operations in early July, UC Davis reported.

So far, June has been the wettest month ever recorded on the West Coast in at least 36 years, says the weather service. To date, California has received an inch and a half of rain at the gauges in Castaic, Rancho Cordova and Arden, as well as 2.53 inches at the gauges in Calistoga, Campbell and San Rafael. More than 23 inches of rain have fallen in just the five-day period ending Sunday.

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