Millennials often suffer from financial stress

Want to reduce stress before stress turns to illness? Then surround yourself with people who have more skin in the game, a new study suggests. In the study, which surveyed thousands of people, researchers…

Millennials often suffer from financial stress

Want to reduce stress before stress turns to illness? Then surround yourself with people who have more skin in the game, a new study suggests.

In the study, which surveyed thousands of people, researchers found that carrying around too much debt is a leading cause of stress, particularly for millennials. The way the authors described it, having many friends who are debt-free lowers the odds of you feeling bad about your own finances.

The survey had people answer questions about their situation in financial terms: If they go out tonight and don’t pay for their drinks, will they feel bad about themselves? Can they make the dinner date without worrying about money? Will they feel guilty about hanging out with other people who are out every night?

Not only are millennials carrying too much debt, but they’re also less likely to use debt wisely, the study found. The authors claim millennials are taking on too much debt for too many home and car loans without putting away much to pay down the debt.

Young people are not only struggling with debt, but they also have a heightened risk of chronic physical and mental health issues, including depression and anxiety, based on 2015 surveys.

“Some stressors are likely to increase the odds of mental and physical health problems,” according to the survey. “Mental and physical health are, by definition, less resilient, which makes stress that much more harmful.”

While carrying large amounts of debt could increase the chance of developing the flu, millennials are also more likely to complain of headaches, heartburn, back pain and back pain, the survey found.

Did you hear about this report in the news? Each time you ask what links relate to stress, you might get a truth bomb:

If you’re stressed out by the end of the day, you’re more likely to make an impulse purchase.

If you have a lot of stress-induced anxiety, you’re more likely to get carpal tunnel syndrome.

If you have some sort of anxiety or insomnia, your stress level isn’t making you smarter.

If you’re carrying too much debt, then you’re more likely to report feeling bad about finances, according to the study.

If you have a problem sleeping, then you’re more likely to be stressed out by everyday life.

If you work very hard, then you’re more likely to burn out.

The new data doesn’t tell us everything about how stress affects our health, but it offers new information about how we cope with stress. The findings also offer young people a more productive message for increasing their financial stability: Don’t be overwhelmed with debt.

This is a newer study because it focused on health and wellness, as opposed to financial behavior. The survey in the study wasn’t general, but instead focused on certain issues: being smart about finances, avoiding stress and taking the time to realize you have less than you think you do.

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