Voice of Hiroshima, Fumiko Nakatani, dies at 96

By Hada Suboh, CNN Staff Writer (CNN) — Fumiko Nakatani, the Hiroshima survivor whose life-long commitment to speaking out against nuclear weapons earned her the title of “Voice of Hiroshima,” has died. She was…

Voice of Hiroshima, Fumiko Nakatani, dies at 96

By Hada Suboh, CNN Staff Writer

(CNN) — Fumiko Nakatani, the Hiroshima survivor whose life-long commitment to speaking out against nuclear weapons earned her the title of “Voice of Hiroshima,” has died. She was 96.

CNN learned of Nakatani’s death Sunday and was not able to speak with her on the phone. A manager at her office, Hakuma Makoto, confirmed her death.

Nakatani was born in Hiroshima on February 2, 1915, the second of three children to Chikata Nakatani, according to her obituary.

She immigrated to Japan in 1932 and received a bachelor’s degree in Japanese literature from Meiji University in 1937.

That year, she married Tomoyuki Nakatani, a high school classmate. They had four children and when her husband died of cancer in 1974, Nakatani dedicated herself to speaking out against nuclear weapons.

Nakatani founded the Hiroshima Peace Children’s Association in 1979, which conducts both public speaking and study programs. In 2001, the organization took on the title of “Voice of Hiroshima.”

In 2006, she came out in support of the ban on landmines.

And in 2013, she spoke out against Japan’s decision to allow the United States to use its military bases on the island of Okinawa for nuclear weapons.

“I feel compelled to stop it,” she said, according to AFP at the time. “I want to plead with the Japanese government to vote against any nuclear energy project or any nuclear weapons project.”

Nakatani was awarded the posthumous Hiroshima Peace Prize in 2005.

She is survived by her two youngest daughters, two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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